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Snap Chat & Doritos with Swae Lee
00:06
Blue Whales on Explore the Wild
02:54

Blue Whales on Explore the Wild

Explore the Wild is a Nature series produced by www.VideoFort.com in partnership with REP Interactive. In this series, VideoFort will take you on a tour of the world's most exotic locations and teach you about the planet's most exotic animals. In this episode on Explore the Wild, we feature Blue Whales. You will learn interesting facts about the species and their natural habitat. http://www.VideoFort.com Blue Whales The blue whale is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder of baleen whales. The blue whale is the largest animal on the planet, weighing as much as 200 tons (approximately 33 elephants). The blue whale has a heart the size of a VW Beetle. Its stomach can hold one ton of krill and it needs to eat about four tons of krill each day to survive. They are the loudest animals on Earth, even louder than a jet engine. Their calls reach 188 decibels, while a jet reaches 140 decibels. Their low frequency whistle can be heard for hundreds of miles and is probably used to attract other blue whales. Blue whales can reach speeds of 31 mph over short bursts, usually when interacting with other whales, but 12 mph is a more typical traveling speed. When feeding, they slow down to 3.1 mph. Blue whales most commonly live alone or with one other individual. It is not known how long traveling pairs stay together. In locations where there is a high concentration of food, as many as 50 blue whales have been seen scattered over a small area. They do not form the large, close-knit groups seen in other baleen species. Whales are at the top of the food chain and have an important role in the overall health of the marine environment. During the 20th century, the blue whale was an important whaling target and even after it was protected and commercial whaling stopped in 1966, exploitation efforts by the former Soviet Union persisted. A 2002 report estimated there were about 5,000 to 12,000 blue whales worldwide, located in at least five groups. Like other large whales, blue whales are threatened by environmental change including habitat loss and toxics. Blue whales can also be harmed by ship strikes and by becoming entangled in fishing gear. Although commercial whaling no longer represents a threat, climate change and its impact on krill (shrimp-like crustaceans), blue whales' major prey, makes this cetacean particularly vulnerable.
Cheetahs on Explore the Wild
03:15

Cheetahs on Explore the Wild

Explore the Wild is a Nature series produced by http://www.VideoFort.com in partnership with REP Interactive. In this series, VideoFort will take you on a tour of the world's most exotic locations and teach you about the planet's most exotic animals. In this episode on Explore the Wild, we feature Cheetahs. You will learn interesting facts about the species and their natural habitat. Cheetahs- The cheetah is a large feline inhabiting most of Africa and parts of the Middle East. They are naturally found in the open grasslands of eastern and southwestern Africa. They are long and lanky, with a yellow-grey fur spotted with dark dots. The word cheetah comes from the Sanskrit word 'chitraka' meaning 'the spotted one'. The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal— as fast as 70 to 75 mph. Bursts of high speed give the cheetah an enormous advantage as a predator. Its slender, long-legged body is adapted to enable it to reach high speeds. The cheetah is smaller, leaner than other big cats, measuring 44 to 53 inches long with a tail length of 26 to 33 inches. Cheetahs usually weigh 110-140 lb. The head is small with eyes set high and a black 'tear mark' running from the inner aspect of each eye down to the mouth. The cheetah is the world's fastest land mammal, and the most unique and specialized member of the cat family. It can achieve a speed of 60 mph per hour in just 3 seconds. These nimble cats are extremely agile and can make swift, sudden turns in pursuit of prey. Cheetahs are diurnal hunters and use their distinctive spotted coats to blend with the high grasses. The chase is usually over in less than a minute, after which the cheetah drags its prey to a shady corner to devour its meal. Males are territorial. Females' home ranges can be very large and a territory including several females' ranges is impossible to defend. Instead, males choose the points at which several of the females' home ranges overlap, creating a much smaller space, which can be properly defended against intruders while maximizing the chance of reproduction. The cheetah is a vulnerable species. Of all the big cats, it is the least able to adapt to new environments. It has always proved difficult to breed in captivity, although recently a few zoos have managed to succeed at this. Cheetahs are included on the International Union for Conservation of Nature list of vulnerable species as well as on the US Endangered Species Act as a threatened species. Approximately 12,400 cheetahs remain in the wild in twenty-five African countries; Namibia has the most, with about 2,500. Another fifty to sixty critically endangered Asiatic cheetahs are thought to remain in Iran.